Hello and welcome! Please understand that this website is not affiliated with Guerlain in any way, it is only a reference page for collectors and those who have enjoyed the classic fragrances of days gone by.

The main objective of this website is to chronicle the history of the Guerlain fragrances and showcase the bottles and advertising used throughout the years.

However, one of the other goals of this website is to show the present owners of the Guerlain perfume company how much we miss the discontinued classics and hopefully, if they see that there is enough interest and demand, they will bring back these fragrances!

Please leave a comment below (for example: of why you liked the fragrance, describe the scent, time period or age you wore it, who gave it to you or what occasion, any specific memories, what it reminded you of, maybe a relative wore it, or you remembered seeing the bottle on their vanity table), who knows, perhaps someone from the current Guerlain brand might see it.

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Wednesday, January 30, 2013

Tsao-Ko c1879

Tsao-Ko: created by Jacques Guerlain in 1879, for women, named after a species of cardamom.


Fragrance Composition:


What does it smell like? It is classified as a powdery oriental fougere fragrance.
  • Top notes: rice powder, jasmine, aromatic notes, balsamic notes
  • Middle notes: jasmine, rose, cassie, ylang ylang, spices, Tonkin musk, leather, sandalwood, civet
  • Base notes: iris, ambrette, oakmoss

Country Life, 1902:
"M. Guerlain who is an authority on all matters relating the uses and abuses of scents says that it is the greatest to imagine that sachet powder perfumes. According to him, the only pleasant way of perfuming "laces, linen and ladies" is with an extract and a vaporiser; nothing else is of any real use. It is also a mistake to adopt one perfume alone, for it is essential not only to vary one's perfume with the seasons, but for every occasion. We do not wear the same dress in the evening as in the morning, in a motor-car, or in the saddle, and a moment's reflection will show that the scent that is agreeable in the open air can be offensive at a dinner-table. If we once study this question, as it should be studied by all women of refined taste, we shall find that we cannot do better than follow the Parisienne, who never favours what are called extracts of flowers - carnation, lilac, mignonette, etc. She has learnt that the majority of these scents are made from petroleum or terpinol, and have nothing in common with the names they bear. Let us follow her in her selection for spring. She chooses "Tsao Ko" or "Zicky" [sic] for her perfume for her morning ride in the Bois "Fleur Qui Meurt" for a dinner party, and "Jardin de Mon Curé" for the Opera. If you are passing through the Rue de la Paix, call in at Guerlain's and judge how exquisite is her taste." 


Bottles:

Flacon Ovale, c1900, photo from drouot



Wartime bottle, c1930s-1940s.


Fate of the Fragrance:


Still being sold around 1914 and into WW2. Currently Discontinued.




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